Monthly Archives: October 2015

HEART ATTACK RISKS

Understand your risk factors and take action … before you have a heart attack.

Your Heart Book Cover- Final FINALThe American College of Cardiology reported young women with heart attacks are more likely to die than men. Part of this scenario is because many women do not experience the classic symptoms of chest pressure, arm, or jaw pain. Women are also more likely to report stomach symptoms, fatigue or shortness of breath instead of chest pressure when a coronary artery is closing. Without the proper diagnosis, life-saving interventions including stents to open a closing artery are delayed or not performed.

In a study evaluating women under age 55, Yale researchers found half the women believed they were healthy prior to a heart attack. Fewer women than men in the study had not received education from their care providers regarding risks for heart disease. Many of the women had modifiable risks and only 22% of them received information about heart disease and how to reduce their risks.

Nearly half of women in a 2012 survey did not report heart disease as a leading cause of death, yet they considered themselves well-informed on female health issues. Read a quick take on statistics and how you can identify and reduce your risks.

Excerpt from Your Heart book:

Women and Heart Disease

Many women do not realize they are at high risk for heart disease and early death. Under age 50, heart attacks in women are twice as likely to be fatal as in men. Each year more than 250,000 women die of heart attacks. Six times the number of women die from heart disease than from breast cancer. Many factors weigh into these statistics including hormones.

♥ Research reported in the National Institutes of Health bulletin, The Heart Truth for Women, states that by leading a healthy lifestyle, women can lower risks by 82%. You are in charge. This means: regular exercise, healthy weight and not smoking. Also take medications to control other risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol. What you choose to do and what you eat can improve health and prolong life.

♥♥♥♥♥

Five risk factors both men and women can modify and reduce their risk for dying from a heart attack:
• High cholesterol
• Smoking, tobacco use
• Diabetes
• Obesity
• High blood pressure

What to do about these risks: See your physician for an evaluation

  • Check your cholesterol and blood pressure.
  • Treat cholesterol and blood pressure abnormalities with diet modification and medication.
  • Stop all tobacco use.
  • Keep blood glucose normal with diet and medication.
  • Eat a Mediterranean diet and control your calorie intake. Consider the 5/2 diet for weight reduction (discussed in previous blogs on this website)
  • Exercise at least 30 minutes each day.

Betty Kuffel, MD

Advertisements

Sleep Apnea Affects Memory and Heart Health

Are you sleepy during the daytime? Is snoring a problem? Both are symptoms of a serious health problem. Apnea means without breath. Sleep apnea occurs when air movement in and out of the lungs is reduced during sleep, making blood oxygen plummet. Brain sensors identify the low oxygenSunset level and high carbon dioxide shift. This, in turn, triggers partial awakening to correct the problem. Deeper breathing is stimulated, often accompanied by loud snoring as increased effort overcomes the obstruction.

Once the airway is opened again, oxygen rises and carbon dioxide drops. The extra breathing stimulus isn’t needed…and sleep resumes. This cycle repeats many times each night. During most episodes, full awakening doesn’t occur. Other times, the person suddenly awakens gasping and choking. Individuals with sleep apnea may not experience overt symptoms, may be unaware of snoring episodes, and don’t realize their memory lapses and frequent naps are related to a problem that also increases their risk for serious heart problems.

Obesity contributes to this problem, but many thin people are affected, too. Alcohol, narcotics and sedatives relax throat muscles resulting in breathing problems. A narrow airway or large tonsils, even in children, can cause sleep apnea.

There are two primary types of sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the airway is blocked by oral tissue when throat muscles relax during sleep. Central sleep apnea is related to reduction of the respiration mechanism in the brain. Both types negatively affect health.

To diagnose the problem, a sleep study to continuously monitor oxygen, heart rate rhythm, and wakening is needed. The primary treatment for sleep apnea is “continuous positive airway pressure,” known as CPAP. This means wearing a carefully fitted mask attached to a small machine. The pressure and fit are individualized for each person to produce enough air pressure to keep their airway open during the normal relaxation of muscle tone during sleep. The adjustment to wearing such an apparatus may be inconvenient and a bit awkward at first, but can be life-saving.

After a good night’s sleep most people with sleep apnea experience a significant improvement in health and wellbeing. Small travel units are available.

What are the symptoms of sleep apnea?
• Restless sleep and fatigue
• Frequent awakening
• Daytime sleepiness, irritability
• Reduced memory
• Morning headaches and confusion
• Chest discomfort
• Children and teens may be poor students
• Behavioral problems in children

Health and heart risks associated with sleep apnea:
• Car accidents due to daytime sleepiness
• Atrial fibrillation, irregular heart beat
• Heart attacks and strokes
• High blood pressure
• Sudden death
• Dementia

Consult a physician and inquire about a sleep study if you are concerned about this health problem.

www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sleepapnea
Betty & Bev