Type II Diabetes Epidemic

Diabetes Increases Risk for Heart Disease

Obesity ConceptMillions of people have Type II diabetes and the number is growing with the obesity epidemic. At first, as blood sugars rise, Type II diabetes is a silent disease without recognized symptoms, but behind-the-scenes, excess sugar molecules in the blood are causing harm.

Diabetes occurs when inadequate insulin is available for sugar metabolism. Instead of being used by cells for energy, the sugar molecules increase in the blood and interfere with cell function. This leads to heart disease, high blood pressure, strokes, vision impairment and kidney damage.

Type II diabetes is a complex metabolic problem. Although the body produces enough insulin at first, it isn’t being used properly because at the cellular level, insulin resistance develops. This stimulating the pancreas to produce more and more insulin, until the cells become distressed and die off, leaving the body unable to maintain proper insulin production. The disease worsens.

Treatment for diabetes is variable. It can be very complex, requiring numerous medications, self testing and the addition of insulin injections. Some people do very well for years in a pre-diabetic state. If a fasting blood sugar is minimally elevated, just taking the oral medication metformin, may reduce progression. But if the sugar continues to rise, additional treatment must be started as soon as possible to normalize the sugar.

If someone you know is overweight, particularly if the weight is carried around the waistline, blood sugar levels should be monitored and treated if elevated. Losing weight will help, but weight loss is not easy.

Best results occur with reduced caloric intake and healthful food choices, combined Family exercisewith exercise. Even walking thirty minutes a day, helps lower blood sugar, burns calories and improves longevity.

Type I diabetes is different from Type II. Type I is usually seen in young often thin people, including infants and children. Cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed and are unable to produce insulin, a hormone essential for sugar metabolism. Insulin cannot be taken orally. It must be injected or taken as a nasal spray.

obesityType II diabetes had been a disease of aging people until recent years when overweight children began developing this serious problem. Like adults, children are at risk for serious cardiovascular disease. Elevated blood glucose levels damage arteries throughout the body. Over time the vessels become so narrowed they cannot carry an adequate supply of oxygen-rich blood and nutrients to vital organs. As more children become obese, more of them develop diabetes and are at risk for early heart disease.

So, what should we do? First, understand that Type II diabetes is a serious health risk even when no symptoms are apparent. The American Diabetes Association recommends having a fasting blood sugar test performed at least annually. Blood is taken after having nothing to eat or drink for at least eight hours. A fasting blood sugar above 100 is abnormal.

Another blood test, the hemoglobin A1C, measures red blood cell glucose attachment. This test correlates directly with the blood glucose levels over preceding weeks/months. If the A1C is 8, the glucose average has been 183mg/dl. Until more information becomes available, specialists believe an A1C goal of <7% is valuable in reducing health risks.

Symptoms of High Blood Sugar:
Excess urination (Ex.-Getting up at night repeatedly.)
Excess water consumption (Ex.-Drinking water during the night.)
Increased appetite, blurred vision, low energy
Neuropathy (burning pain and numb feelings in hands and feet)

Additional information regarding diabetes, healthful eating and weight control can be found on the following websites:
www.realage.com, www.diabetes.orgDiabetes Health in your handsBetty Kuffel, MD

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This entry was posted in Exercise, Health Updates, Heart Disease, Heart Health, High Blood Pressure and tagged , , , , , on by .

About lipsticklogic

Betty Kuffel, MD FACP An honors graduate of the University of Washington School of Medicine, Internal Medicine physician and former nurse practitioner, Dr. Kuffel has broad healthcare experience. After years of directing and working in emergency departments, and directing hospitalist inpatient care, recently Dr. Kuffel retired to pursue many interests including writing this blog for women. Because of a shared desire to help women of all ages achieve healthy fulfilled lives, she joined with her sister Bev Erickson and founded Lipstick Logic ™ to bring health and lifestyle education to women. Their contributions to educating women include hosting and speaking at women’s conferences, writing a health blog on LipstickLogic.com and writing a monthly health column for Montana Woman Magazine. Dr Kuffel has been recognized for her commitment to helping others. The Lipstick Logic concept evolved over years of caring for women in crisis. Dr. Kuffel believes education is the key to living healthier and making informed choices. Heart disease is the focus their collaborative book, Your Heart: Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease. Coronary artery disease is the number one cause of death and it is preventable. See: YourHeartBook.com

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