Tag Archives: Monitor your blood pressure

Heart Disease is Preventable

IF CORONARY DISEASE IS PREVENTABLE WHY IS IT THE LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH IN BOTH MEN AND WOMEN?

The simple answer: Coronary artery narrowing is a silent disease that develops over many years from untreated risk factors that are unknown or not addressed.

People don’t realize they have heart disease until something bad happens, such as a heart attack or sudden death. They don’t realize subtle symptoms such as mild shortness of breath, upset stomach and fatigue are signs of heart disease. Women tend to complain less and are more often not diagnosed when they do see a physician.

Narrowed coronary arteries restrict blood flow to the heart muscle and begin causing symptoms that resolve with rest. When arteries become blocked, the pain persists. A part of theArtery heart dies because the muscle is starved of blood and oxygen. Sweating, weakness, discomfort in the chest, jaw, neck, arm and sometimes the back are common with a heart attack. This is a medical emergency and 911 should be called for immediate medical care. If the artery can be opened with angioplasty and stents soon enough, heart damage is decreased. Fifty percent of people who have heart attacks die before reaching a hospital.

Coronary artery disease is preventable, but unhealthy lifestyles and food choices are difficult to change. We live in a fast food environment. The number of people smoking has decreased and some people are making healthier food choices through education, but heart disease is still the leading cause of death. Obesity has increased to epidemic proportions, even in the young, so we have a long way to go to become a healthier nation.

50% of US citizens have either high blood pressure, high cholesterol or smoke
2/3 of adults are overweight or obese
1/3 of children are overweight or obese
Overweight 5-year-olds show evidence of early heart disease

Take control of your health and reduce heart disease risks with healthy actions. See a physician to monitor health and measure glucose, thyroid, cholesterol, vitamin D, blood count and inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein.
♥ Stop tobacco use
♥ Control high blood pressure
♥ Treat abnormal cholesterol levels with dietary modification and medication
♥ Obesity and Diabetes: normalize weight and glucose
♥ Exercise daily with your doctor’s recommendation
♥ Limit alcohol consumption
♥ Consider heredity factors and obtain early testing/treatment

You can counteract good genes by making bad life choices. You can offset bad genes by making healthy choices. The choice is yours to make.

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NEW BLOOD PRESSURE GUIDELINES

September 11, 2015

High blood pressure increases risk for:
heart attacks, heart failure, strokes, and kidney failure.

Blood pressure.2Until today, physicians did not have an optimal goal for patients with high blood pressure. New information released from the Sprint study was reported by officials from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. A paper with all the data will be published in a few months.

The Sprint study examined nearly 10,000 men and women, ages 50 and older, who were at risk for heart and kidney disease. Twenty-eight percent of the participants were over the age of 75.

Officials from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute announced they ended the study a year before the planned conclusion because of the potentially lifesaving results. This is extremely important information because high blood pressure is so prevalent. One in three people (79 million adults in the US), have high blood pressure and half of those being treated have systolic pressures over 140.

About two years ago, a panel of experts at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute panel recommended a systolic goal of 140 because there was no convincing data to show lower was better, now we have that data.

There have been improvements over the past few years with healthier lifestyles, more exercise and lowering abnormal lipid levels, but cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death. Uncontrolled high blood pressure contributes to heart disease in addition to the other disorders noted above. It is important to monitor your blood pressure and take control of your health. If your blood pressure is consistently above 120 systolic (the upper reading), see your healthcare provider for assistance in lowering your blood pressure to 120 or below.

Betty Kuffel, MD